Did You Know

Did You Know?

didyouknow


There are a lot of famous Lions?

jimmy

Past U.S. President Jimmy Carter

Click here to see a special public service announcement from President Jimmy Carter on Campaign SightFirst II


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Sir Edmund Hillary 1st Ascent of Mount Everest (with Tenzing Norgay) and Humanitarian who has helped build over 60 hospitals and schools for the Nepali and Tibetan Sherpa people


 The Founder of the Lions Club International – Melvin Jones  (from Wikipedia.org) 

Melvin Jones (January 13, 1879 – June 1, 1961) was the founder of Lions Clubs International.

He was born in Fort Thomas, Arizona (at that time the Arizona Territory). His father was a captain in the United States Army. In 1886 or '87, the family moved east when his father was transferred. Melvin Jones settled in Chicago, where he studied at the Union Business and Chaddock Colleges of Quincy, Illinois. At age 33 he was the sole owner of his own insurance agency in Chicago and became a member of the local business circle, and was elected secretary shortly thereafter. Melvin Jones was also a Freemason.

After two years, prompted by his personal code – "You can't get very far until you start doing something for somebody else" – Jones proposed that the talents of the circle's members could be better utilized in other areas of community life,[1] He invited representative from other men's clubs in and around Chicago to a meeting to devise a suitable organization; from this meeting Lions Clubs International was formed on June 7, 1917.[2] Jones eventually gave up his insurance agency to work full-time at Lions International Headquarters in Chicago.

In 1945, Jones represented Lions Clubs International as a consultant at the United Nations Conference on International Organization in San Francisco. In 1950, Lions International acknowledged Jones' contributions to the organization by awarding him the title of Secretary General for life. In 1961 the International Board of Directors proclaimed January 13 (the birthday of Melvin Jones) as a day of memory each year throughout the world of Lionism.


About the Lions and Helen Keller

Helen Keller's Speech at 1925 International Convention
Cedar Point, Ohio, USA
June 30, 1925

Transcript

Dear Lions and Ladies:

I suppose you have heard the legend that represents opportunity as a capricious lady, who knocks at every door but once, and if the door isn't opened quickly, she passes on, never to return. And that is as it should be. Lovely, desirable ladies won't wait. You have to go out and grab 'em.

I am your opportunity. I am knocking at your door. I want to be adopted. The legend doesn't say what you are to do when several beautiful opportunities present themselves at the same door. I guess you have to choose the one you love best. I hope you will adopt me. I am the youngest here, and what I offer you is full of splendid opportunities for service.

The American Foundation for the Blind is only four years old. It grew out of the imperative needs of the blind, and was called into existence by the sightless themselves. It is national and international in scope and in importance. It represents the best and most enlightened thought on our subject that has been reached so far. Its object is to make the lives of the blind more worthwhile everywhere by increasing their economic value and giving them the joy of normal activity.

Try to imagine how you would feel if you were suddenly stricken blind today. Picture yourself stumbling and groping at noonday as in the night; your work, your independence, gone. In that dark world wouldn't you be glad if a friend took you by the hand and said, "Come with me and I will teach you how to do some of the things you used to do when you could see?" That is just the kind of friend the American Foundation is going to be to all the blind in this country if seeing people will give it the support it must have.

You have heard how through a little word dropped from the fingers of another, a ray of light from another soul touched the darkness of my mind and I found myself, found the world, found God. It is because my teacher learned about me and broke through the dark, silent imprisonment which held me that I am able to work for myself and for others. It is the caring we want more than money. The gift without the sympathy and interest of the giver is empty. If you care, if we can make the people of this great country care, the blind will indeed triumph over blindness.

The opportunity I bring to you, Lions, is this: To foster and sponsor the work of the American Foundation for the Blind. Will you not help me hasten the day when there shall be no preventable blindness; no little deaf, blind child untaught; no blind man or woman unaided? I appeal to you Lions, you who have your sight, your hearing, you who are strong and brave and kind. Will you not constitute yourselves Knights of the Blind in this crusade against darkness?

I thank you.